The Living Century

The Living Century

The Living Century is an American biography television series that premiered on PBS on December 3, 2000. Each episode of the half-hour series documents the life of someone who is over 100 years old. The Living Century was produced and distributed by Reverie Productions.

Premier Passions

Premier Passions

Premier Passions is a five-part British documentary TV series, broadcast on BBC One between 24 February and 31 March 1998. It was narrated by actress and Sunderland fan Gina McKee, directed by Newcastle United fan John Alexander and produced by Stephen Lambert. It chronicled Sunderland A.F.C. during the 1996-97 season, in which the club was relegated from the Premiership, the year after winning promotion from Nationwide League Division One. The programme gave unprecedented insight into the goings-on in and around a Premier League football team, with the 45-minute episodes following a chronological order, beginning in December 1996 with the club sitting comfortably mid-table and mapping the next five months until relegation on the final day of the season. A constant theme was the club's thwarted search to sign a new striker who might have scored the goals to save the team from relegation. The boardroom was also not out of bounds as the documentary records the club's decision to float on the stock market, as well as meetings and debates regarding the club's move to a new home, the Stadium of Light. The most memorable feature of the series was the language used by then-manager Peter Reid and his assistant Bobby Saxton during team-talks, usually at half-time, which were often full of swearing. The show often brought minor local fame to members of staff at the club, arguably most memorably, the then-groundsman Tommy Porter. Four supporters, professing to be lifelong fans, comprising a cross section of the local population, from schoolgirl to painter to lab technician to retailer, also gave insight and reaction to results and club decisions.

Ms. Adventure

Ms. Adventure

Ms. Adventure was an American documentary reality television series that premiered on Animal Planet on January 19, 2007. The program was hosted by Rachel Reenstra.

Trouble at the Top

Trouble at the Top

Trouble at the Top was a business-based BBC television fly on the wall documentary broadcast on BBC2. A spin off four-part series, Trouble at the Big Top, followed developments at the Millennium Dome in a similar style.

Fourteen Days in May

Fourteen Days in May

Fourteen Days in May is a documentary directed by Paul Hamann and originally shown on television by the British Broadcasting Corporation in 1987. The programme recounts the final days before the execution of Edward Earl Johnson, an American prisoner convicted of rape and murder and imprisoned in the Mississippi State Penitentiary. Johnson protested his innocence and claimed that his confession had been made under duress. He was executed in Mississippi's gas chamber on 20 May 1987. The documentary crew, given access to the prison warden, guards and chaplain and to Johnson and his family, filmed the last days of Johnson's life in detail. The documentary argues against the death penalty and maintains that capital punishment is disproportionately applied to African-Americans convicted of crimes against whites. The programme features attorney Clive Stafford Smith, a noted advocate against capital punishment. Fourteen Days in May won a British Film Institute Grierson Award and a top prize at the Festival dei Populi. It has been shown in many countries but has only appeared in an abbreviated form in the United States, on HBO. Hamann disowned this shortened version. It was in direct response to this documentary that the Lifelines organisation was set up, to organise pen pals for death row prisoners.

I.R.S. Records Presents The Cutting Edge Volumes I & II

I.R.S. Records Presents The Cutting Edge Volumes I & II

I.R.S. Records Presents The Cutting Edge is a music program that aired on MTV from March 1983 to September 1987, on the last Sunday of every month. The first year of the show featured a variety of hosts including Jools Holland, Jeffrey Vallance, and Wazmo Nariz before settling on Peter Zaremba, the lead singer of The Fleshtones. Interviews with musicians and performances were videotaped in clubs, recording studios and private homes. In 1986, the name of the show changed to The Cutting Edge Happy Hour and was videotaped at a single location, the Hollywood Holiday Inn.

Beyond the Clouds

Beyond the Clouds

A documentary about life in the town of Lijiang in 1994. At the time, Lijiang was a remote town in China's south-west. As times have changes, the town has become a major tourist destination, making this documentary a fascinating time-capsule of what life was like in small town China.

The Body Human

The Body Human

The Body Human was a series of specials produced by the National Geographic Society and telecast by CBS, between 1977 and 1984. They were produced and directed by Alfred R. Kelman, who was nominated for an Academy Award in 1966 for The Face of a Genius. Unlike most National Geographic specials, this series did not concentrate on exploring nature or the origins of man, but, as the name implied, on aspects of the human body, from plastic surgery to sexual function. Alexander Scourby was the narrator. The series was nominated for and won Emmy Awards.

Baboon Woman

Baboon Woman

Baboon Woman is a wildlife documentary starring Karin Saks. In South Africa, baboons have historically been treated as pests and are persecuted. As human development continues to encroach on natural habitats, the war between humans and non-human primates in South Africa, is increasing. Non-lethal methods to manage perceived "problem" non-human primates are encouraged by a number of baboon experts in South Africa. The documentary - Baboon Woman - highlights the struggle between humans and wildlife living in close proximity; illustrating the responses of gun toting farmers, baboon experts, and residents who are frustrated at having their property raided by baboons. A farmer interviewed admits to shooting about five baboons a week in spite of the fact that this method does not deter baboons from raiding his crops. Residents who live in areas where baboon/human conflict is unusually magnified because human development has cut the baboons off from other more natural areas, are divided in their opinions which range from deterring baboons from human properties using acceptable non-lethal methods and enjoying having the baboons visit human homes. One of Saks' main goals is to break down the misconceptions about non-human primates, this being one of the greatest threats.

The Day After Trinity: J. Robert Oppenheimer and the Atomic Bomb

The Day After Trinity: J. Robert Oppenheimer and the Atomic Bomb

The Day After Trinity is a 1980 documentary film directed and produced by Jon H. Else in association with KTEH public television in San Jose, California. The film tells the story of J. Robert Oppenheimer, the theoretical physicist who led the effort to build the first atomic bomb, tested in July 1945 at Trinity site in New Mexico. Featuring candid interviews with several Manhattan Project scientists, as well as newly declassified archival footage, The Day After Trinity was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature of 1980, and received a Peabody Award in 1981. The film's title comes from an interview seen near the conclusion of the documentary. Robert Oppenheimer is asked for his thoughts on Sen. Robert Kennedy's efforts to urge President Lyndon Johnson to initiate talks to stop the spread of nuclear weapons. "It's 20 years too late," Oppenheimer replies. After a pause he states, "It should have been done the day after Trinity."

The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century

The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century

The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century is a 1996 documentary series that aired on PBS. It chronicles World War I over eight episodes. It was narrated by Dame Judi Dench in the UK and Salome Jens in the United States. The series won two Primetime Emmy Awards: one for Jeremy Irons for Outstanding Voice-Over Performance, the other for Outstanding Informational Series. In 1997, it was given a Peabody Award.